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Strategies for Effective Digital Presentations

Page history last edited by Mary Clay Vick 9 years, 4 months ago

 

The Ted Commandments of Effective Presentations

 

 

 

 

excerpts from National Conference for State Legislatures "Tips for Making Effective PowerPoint Presentations"

source:  http://www.ncsl.org/

 

Included in this overview:

  • Tips for Making Effective PowerPoint Presentations
  • 7 Deadly Sins of PowerPoint Presentations
  • Design Tips for Making Effective PowerPoint Presentations

 

Presentation Advice for Ms Kellys class

 

Tips for Making Effective PowerPoint Presentations

  • Use the slide master feature to create a consistent and simple design template.  Be consistent with elements such as font, colors, and background.
  • Simplify and limit the number of words on each screen. Use key phrases and include only essential information.
  • Limit punctuation and avoid putting words in all capital letters. Empty space on the slide will enhance readability.
  • Use contrasting colors for text and background. Light text on a dark background is best. Patterned backgrounds can reduce readability of text.
  • Avoid the use of flashy transitions such as text fly-ins. These features may seem impressive at first, but are distracting and get old quickly.
  • Overuse of special effects such as animation and sounds may make your presentation “cutesy” and could negatively impact your credibility.
  • Use good quality images that reinforce and complement your message. Ensure that your image maintains its impact and resolution when projected on a larger screen.
  • Limit the number of slides. Presenters who constantly “flip” to the next slide are likely to lose their audience. A good rule of thumb is one slide per minute.
  • Do not read from your slides. The content of your slides is for the audience, not for the presenter.
  • Do not speak to your slides. Many presenters face the direction of their presentation rather than their audience.
  • Do not apologize for anything in your presentation. If you believe something will be hard to read or understand, don’t use it.
  • When possible, run your presentation from the hard disk rather than a USB or online source. Running from those locations may slow your presentation.

 

 Presentation

  • Plan carefully.
  • Do your research.
  • Know your audience.
  • Time your presentation.
  • Speak comfortably and clearly.
  • Check the spelling and grammar.
  • Do not read the presentation. Practice the presentation so you can speak from bullet points. The text should be a cue for the presenter rather than a message for the viewer.
  • Give a brief overview at the start. Then present the information. Finally review important points.
  • It is often more effective to have bulleted points appear one at a time so the audience listens to the presenter rather than reading the screen.
  • If sound effects are used, wait until the sound has finished to speak.
  • If the content is complex, print the slides so the audience can take notes.
  • Do not turn your back on the audience. Try to position the monitor so you can speak from it.

 

 

 

Design Tips for Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Fonts

  • Select a single font such as Arial or Helvetica. Avoid fonts such as Times New Roman or Palatino because these fonts are sometimes difficult to read.
  • Use no font size smaller than 24 point.
  • Use the same font for all your headlines.
  • Select a font for body copy and another for headlines.
  • Use bold and different sizes of those fonts for captions and subheadings.
  • Don’t use more than four fonts in any one publication.
  • Clearly label each screen. Use a larger font (35-45 points) or different color for the title.
  • Use larger fonts to indicate importance.
  • Use different colors, sizes and styles (e.g., bold) for impact.
  • Avoid italicized fonts as these are difficult to read quickly.
  • Avoid long sentences.
  • Avoid abbreviations and acronyms.
  • Limit punctuation marks.
  • No more than 6-8 words per line
  • For bullet points, use the 6 x 6 Rule. One thought per line with no more than 6 words per line and no more than 6 lines per slide
  • Use dark text on light background or light text on dark background. However, dark backgrounds sometimes make it difficult for some people to read the text.
  • Do not use all caps except for titles.

 

  

Design and Graphical Images

  • Use design templates.
  • Standardize position, colors, and styles.
  • Include only necessary information.
  • Use colors that contrast and compliment.
  • Too may slides can lose your audience.
  • Keep the background consistent and subtle.
  • Limit the number of transitions used. It is often better to use only one so the audience knows what to expect.
  • Use a single style of dingbat for bullets throughout the page.
  • Use the same graphical rule at the top of all pages in a multi-page document.
  • Use one or two large images rather than several small images.
  • Prioritize images instead of a barrage of images for competing attention.
  • Make images all the same size.
  • Use the same border.
  • Arrange images vertically or horizontally.
  • Use only enough text when using charts or graphical images to explain the chart or graph and clearly label the image.
  • Keep the design clean and uncluttered. Leave empty space around the text and graphical images.
  • Use quality clipart and use it sparingly. A graphical image should relate to and enhance the topic of the slide.
  • Try to use the same style graphical image throughout the presentation (e.g., cartoon, photographs)
  • Limit the number of graphical images on each slide.
  • Repetition of an image reinforces the message. Tie the number of copies of an image to the numbers in your text.
  • Resize, recolor, reverse to turn one image into many. Use duplicates of varying sizes, colors, and orientations to multiply the usefulness of a single clip art image.
  • Make a single image stand out with dramatic contrast. Use color to make a dramatic change to a single copy of your clip art.
  • Check all images on a projection screen before the actual presentation.
  • Avoid flashy images and noisy animation effects unless it relates directly to the slide.

 

Color

  • Limit the number of colors on a single screen.
  • Bright colors make small objects and thin lines stand out. However, some vibrant colors are difficult to read when projected.
  • Use no more than four colors on one chart.
  • Check all colors on a projection screen before the actual presentation. Colors may project differently than what appears on the monitor.

 

 

 

 

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